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The Weekend Effect Within and Downwind of Sacramento: Part 2. Observational Evidence for Chemical and Dynamical Contributions : Volume 6, Issue 6 (24/11/2006)

By Murphy, J. G.

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Book Id: WPLBN0003974898
Format Type: PDF Article :
File Size: Pages 49
Reproduction Date: 2015

Title: The Weekend Effect Within and Downwind of Sacramento: Part 2. Observational Evidence for Chemical and Dynamical Contributions : Volume 6, Issue 6 (24/11/2006)  
Author: Murphy, J. G.
Volume: Vol. 6, Issue 6
Language: English
Subject: Science, Atmospheric, Chemistry
Collections: Periodicals: Journal and Magazine Collection, Copernicus GmbH
Historic
Publication Date:
2006
Publisher: Copernicus Gmbh, Göttingen, Germany
Member Page: Copernicus Publications

Citation

APA MLA Chicago

Millet, D. B., Goldstein, A. H., Murphy, J. G., Cleary, P. A., Cohen, R. C., Day, D. A., & Wooldridge, P. J. (2006). The Weekend Effect Within and Downwind of Sacramento: Part 2. Observational Evidence for Chemical and Dynamical Contributions : Volume 6, Issue 6 (24/11/2006). Retrieved from http://worldebooklibrary.com/


Description
Description: University of California at Berkeley, Department of Chemistry, USA. Observations of day-of-week patterns and diurnal profiles of ozone, volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides are examined to assess the chemical and dynamical factors governing the daytime ozone accumulation and the distribution of chemically related species in Central California. Isoprene observations show that urban OH concentrations are higher on the weekend whereas rural OH concentrations are lower on the weekend, confirming that NOx concentrations have a direct effect on the rate of photochemical ozone production and that the transition from NOx-saturated (VOC-limited) to NOx-limited chemistry occurs between the city and the downwind rural counties. We quantify the extent to which mixing of ozone and its precursors from aloft contributes to the daytime accumulation of ozone at the surface in Sacramento. Ozone production in the rural Mountain Counties is currently NOx-limited and will decrease in response to NOx emission reductions in the Sacramento Valley. However, NOx emissions reductions of at least 50% (from weekday levels) are necessary to bring about a significant decrease in accumulation of ozone at the surface in the Sacramento Valley. The impact of NOx emission reductions on the frequency of exceeding the federal 8-hour ozone standard at an individual site will depend on the balance between reduced titration and the sign and magnitude of production changes. We further show that HNO3 production, which depends on the product of OH and NO2 mixing ratios, is a constant at high NOx, suggesting that NOx must be reduced below a threshold before nitrate aerosol can be expected to decrease.

Summary
The weekend effect within and downwind of Sacramento: Part 2. Observational evidence for chemical and dynamical contributions

 

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