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Consequences of Longterm-Confinement and Hypobaric Hypoxia on Immunity in the Antarctic Concordia Environment

By: Crucian, Brian; Pierson, Duane; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Salam, Alex; Sams, Clarenc; Chouker, Alexander

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; This slide presentation reviews the affects of longterm-confinement and hypobaric hypoxia on immunity in the Antarctic Concordia environment...

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Azerbaijan

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Flash-Type Discrimination

By: Koshak, William J

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; This viewgraph presentation describes the significant progress made in the flash-type discrimination algorithm development. The contents inc...

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Analog Brothers

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Marquette Island: A Distinct Mafic Lithology Discovered by Opportunity

By: Mittlefehldt, David W. ; Gellert, R. ; Herkenhoff, K. E. ; Clark, B. C. ; Cohen, B. A. ; Fleischer, I. ; Jolliff, B. L. ; Klingelhoefer, G. ; Ming, D. W. ; Yingst, R. A

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; While rolling over the Meridiani Planum sedimentary terrane, the rover Opportunity has occasionally discovered large, 10 cm erratics. Most o...

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August Derleth

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Reverberation Chamber Uniformity Validation and Radiated Susceptibility Test Procedures for the NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory

By: Koppen, Sandra V. ; Mielnik, John J; Nguyen, Truong X.

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; The NASA Langley Research Center's High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory has developed a capability based on the RTCA/DO-160F Section 20...

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Anarchism

Encyclopedia Article

Part of the Politics series on Anarchism Schools of thought Black Capitalist Christian Collectivist Communist Egoist Existentialist Feminist Green Individualist Infoanarchism Insurrectionary Leftist Left-wing market Magonist Mutualist Nationalist Naturist Pacifist Philosophical Platformist Post-anarchist Post-colonial Post-left Primitivist Queer

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Open Rotor Noise Prediction at NASA Langley - Capabilities, Research and Development

By: Farassat, Fereidou

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; The high fuel prices of recent years have caused the operating cost of the airlines to soar. In an effort to bring down the fuel consumption...

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Autism

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Arc-Second Alignment of International X-Ray Observatory Mirror Segments in a Fixed Structure

By: Evans, Tyler, C. ; Saha, Timo T; Chan, Kai-Wing

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; The optics for the International X-Ray Observatory (IXO) require alignment and integration of about fourteen thousand thin mirror segments t...

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Albedo

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Percentage of diffusely reflected sunlight in relation to various surface conditions Albedo (), or reflection coefficient, derived from Latin albedo "whiteness" (or reflected sunlight) in turn from albus "white", is the diffuse reflectivity or reflecting power of a surface. It is the ratio of reflected radiation from the surface to incident radiation upon it. Its dimensionless nature lets it be expressed as a percentage and is measured on a scale from zero for no reflection of a perfectly black surface to 1 for perfect reflection of a white surface. Albedo depends on the frequency of the radiation. When quoted unqualified, it usually refers to some appropriate average across the spectrum of visible light. In general, the albedo depends on the directional distribution of incident radiation, except for Lambertian surfaces, which scatter radiation in all directions according to a cosine function and therefore have an albedo that is independent of the incident distribution. In practice, a bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) may be required to accurately characterize the scattering properties of a surface, but albedo is very useful as a first approximation. The albedo is an important concept in climatology, astronomy, and calculating reflectivity of surfaces in LEED sustainable-rating systems for buildings. The average overall albedo of Earth, its planetary albedo, is 30 to 35% because of cloud cover, but widely varies locally across the surface because of different geological and environmental features.[1] The term was introduced into optics by Johann Heinrich Lambert in his 1760 work Photometria. Terrestrial albedo Sample albedos Surface Typical albedo Fresh asph

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Coupled RANS/LES for SOFIA Cavity Acoustic Prediction

By: Woodruff, Stephen L

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; A fast but accurate approach is described for the determination of the aero-acoustic properties of a large cavity at subsonic flight speeds....

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A

Encyclopedia Article

ISO basic Latin alphabet Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx

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Terrestrial Applications of the Thermal Infrared Sensor, TIRS

By: Smith, Ramsey L. ; Richardson, Cathleen; Irons, James; Reuter, Denni; Thome, Kurtis

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; Landsat satellites have acquired single-band thermal images since 1978. The next satellile in the heritage, Landsat Data Continuity Mission...

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Alabama

Encyclopedia Article

State of Alabama Flag Seal Nickname(s): Yellowhammer State, Heart of Dixie, Cotton State Motto(s): Audemus jura nostra defendere (Latin) We dare defend our rights Official language English Spoken languages As of 2010 English 95.1% Spanish 3.1% Demonym Alabamian[1] Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham 212,038 (2012 estimate) Largest metro

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The Nichols wing cutting equipment

By: Ford, James

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; Described here is wing cutting equipment for the economical production of metal wings for wind tunnel models. The machine will make any size...

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Achilles

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Achilles and the Nereid Cymothoe: Attic red-figure kantharos from Volci (Cabinet des Médailles, Bibliothèque nationale, Paris) Head of Achilles depicted on a 4th-century BC coin from Kremaste, Phthia. Reverse: Thetis, wearing chiton and holding shield of Achilles with his AX monogram. Greek Mythology Deities Primordial Titans Zeus Olympians Pan Nymphs Apollo Dionysus Sea-deities Earth-deities Heroes and heroism Heracles / Hercules (Labors)

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Aerial navigation : on the problem of guiding aircraft in a fog or by night when there is no visibility

By: Loth, Willia

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; The use of magnetic fields and wire to navigate aircraft in conditions of poor visibility is presented. This field may be considered to be d...

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Abraham Lincoln

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Abraham Lincoln Lincoln in 1863, aged 54 16th President of the United States In office March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865 Vice Presidents Hannibal Hamlin (1861–1865) Andrew Johnson (1865) Preceded by James Buchanan Succeeded by Andrew Johnson Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Illinois's 7th district In office March 4, 1847 – March 3, 1849 Preceded by John Henry Succeeded by Thomas Harris Member of the Illinois House of Representatives In office 1834–1842 Personal details Born (1809-02-12)February 12, 1809 Hodgenville, Kentucky, U.S. Died April 15, 1865(1865-04-15) (aged 56) Petersen House, Washington, D.C., U.S. Resting place Lincoln Tomb, Oak Ridge Cemetery Springfield, Illinois, U.S. Nationality American

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Simple means for saving fuel on traffic flights

By: Kook,

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents

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Aristotle

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Aristotle Roman copy in marble of a Greek bronze bust of Aristotle by Lysippus, c. 330 BC. The alabaster mantle is modern. Born 384 BC Stagira, Chalcidice (Chalkidiki), Northern Greece Died 322 BC (aged 62) Euboea, Greece Nationality Greek Era Ancient philosophy Region Western philosophy School Peripatetic school Aristotelianism Main interests Biology Zoology Physics Metaphysics Logic Ethics Rhetoric Music Poetry

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Biomedical Operations and Research Office Toxic Substances Registry System: Index of Material Safety Data Sheets

By: NON

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; The Apr. 1993 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS...

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An American in Paris

Encyclopedia Article

Themes from An American in Paris An American in Paris is a Paris, it evokes the sights and energy of the French capital in the 1920s and is one of his best-known compositions. Gershwin composed An American in Paris on commission from the conductor Walter Damrosch. He scored the piece for the standard instruments of the symphony orchestra plus celesta, saxophones, and automobile horns. He brought back some Parisian taxi horns for the New York premiere of the composition, which took place on December 13, 1928 in Carnegie Hall, with Damrosch conducting the New York Philharmonic.[1] Gershwin completed the orchestration on November 18, less than four weeks before the work's premiere.[2] Gershwin collaborated on the original program notes with the critic and composer Deems Taylor, noting that: "My purpose here is to portray the impression of an American visitor in Paris as he strolls about the city and listens to various street noises and absorbs the French atmosphere." When the tone poem moves into the blues, "our American friend ... has succumbed to a spasm of homesickness." But, "nostalgia is not a fatal disease." The American visitor "once again is an alert spectator of Parisian life" and "the street noises and French atmosphere are triumphant." Contents Background 1 Composition 2 Instrumentation 3 Response 4 Preservation status 5 Recordings 6 Use in film 7

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Infrared Imagery of Shuttle (IRIS) experment: IRIS/STS-3 engineering report

By: NON

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; The IRIS/STS-3 Engineering Report describes the results of the various multidisciplinary efforts which culminated in the successful imaging...

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Academy Award for Best Production Design

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Academy Award for Best Production Design Country United States Presented by Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Currently held by Adam Stockhausen Anna Pinnock The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) Official website The Academy Awards are the oldest awards ceremony for achievements in motion pictures. The Academy Award for Best Production Design recognizes achievement in art direction on a film. The category's original name was Best Art Direction, but was changed to its current name in 2012 for the 85th Academy Awards.[1] This change resulted from the Art Director's branch of the Academy being renamed the Designer's branch. Since 1947, the award is shared with the Set decorator(s). The films below are listed with their production year (for example, the 2000 Academy Award for Best Art Direction is given to a film from 1999). In the lists below, the winner of the award for each year is shown first, followed by the other nominees. Contents 1 Superlatives 2 Best Interior Decoration 2.1 1920s 2.2 1930s 2.3 1940s 3 Best Art Direction – Set Decoration 3.1 1940s 3.2 1950s 3.3 1960s 3.4 1970s

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Organophosphorus insecticide decontaminant

By: Wolverton, Bill C. ; Lefstad, Sandra M; Richter, R.

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; An organophosphorus insecticide decontaminating solution has been developed that can be used on and around aircraft and spray equipment. Thi...

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Academy Awards

Encyclopedia Article

Academy Awards 88th Academy Awards Awarded for Excellence in cinematic achievements Country United States Presented by Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences First awarded May 16, 1929 Official website .orgoscars The Academy Awards or the Oscars is an annual American awards ceremony honoring cinematic achievements in the film industry. The various category winners are awarded a copy of a statuette, officially the Academy Award of Merit, which is better known by its nickname Oscar. The awards, first presented in 1929 at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, are overseen by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS).[1][2] The awards ceremony was first televised in 1953, and is now seen live in more than 200 countries.[3] The Oscars is the oldest entertainment awards ceremony; its equivalents, the Emmy Awards for television, the Tony Awards for theatre, and the Grammy Awards for music and recording, are modeled after the Academy Awards.[4] The 86th Academy Awards ceremony was held on March 2, 2014, at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, later than usual as to not clash with the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.[5] The 87th Academy Awards ceremony was held on February 22, 2015. Historically given during the first quarter of the new year, the awards honor achievements for cinematic accomplishments for the preceding year. For example, 12 Years a Slave was awarded Best Picture for 2013, although the Oscar cere

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The 1992 Langley Aerospace Research Summer Scholars (LARSS) program

By: NON

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; The overwhelming majority of the LARSS participants rated their overall summer research experience as good or excellent. Even though the 199...

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Actrius

Encyclopedia Article

Actrius Directed by Ventura Pons Produced by Ventura Pons Written by Ventura Pons Josep Maria Benet i Jornet Starring Núria Espert Rosa Maria Sardà Anna Lizaran Mercè Pons Music by Carles Cases Production company Els Films de la Rambla, S.A. Release dates 1996 (1996) Running time 90 minutes Country Spain Language Catalan Actrius (Catalan: Actresses) is a 1996 film directed by Ventura Pons. In the film, there are no male actors and the four leading actresses dubbed themselves in the Castilian version. Synopsis In order to prepare the role of an important old actress, a theatre student interviews three actresses who were her pupils: an international diva (Glòria Marc, played by Núria Espert), a television star (Assumpta Roca, played by Rosa Maria Sardà) and a dubbing director (Maria Caminal, played by Anna Lizaran).

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Overview of Fuzzy Logic

By: Ma, Xiwe

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; Viewgraphs on an overview of fuzzy logic are presented. Topics covered include: fuzzy control system; fuzzy logic; fuzzy inference; fuzzy co...

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Animalia (book)

Encyclopedia Article

Animalia Author Graeme Base Illustrator Graeme Base Country Australia Language English Genre Picture books Publisher Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Publication date 1986 Media type Print (hardcover) Pages 32 ISBN Animalia is an illustrated children's book by Graeme Base. It was originally published in 1986, followed by a tenth anniversary edition in 1996, and a 25th anniversary edition in 2012. Over three million copies have been sold.[1] A special numbered and signed anniversary edition was also published in 1996, with an embossed gold jacket.[2] Contents Synopsis 1 Related products 2 Adaptations 3 Awards 4

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Commercial applications

By: Togai, Masak

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; Viewgraphs on commercial applications of fuzzy logic in Japan are presented. Topics covered include: suitable application area of fuzzy theo...

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International Atomic Time

Encyclopedia Article

International Atomic Time (TAI, from the French name Temps Atomique International[1]) is a high-precision atomic coordinate time standard based on the notional passage of proper time on Earth's geoid.[2] It is the basis for Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), which is used for civil timekeeping all over the Earth's surface, and for Terrestrial Time, which is used for astronomical calculations. As of 30 June 2015 when the last leap second was added,[3] TAI is exactly 36 seconds ahead of UTC. The 36 seconds results from the initial difference of 10 seconds at the start of 1972, plus 26 leap seconds in UTC since 1972. Time coordinates on the TAI scales are conventionally specified using traditional means of specifying days, carried over from non-uniform time standards based on the rotation of the Earth. Specifically, both Julian Dates and the Gregorian calendar are used. TAI in this form was synchronised with Universal Time at the beginning of 1958, and the two have drifted apart ever since, due to the changing motion of the Earth. Contents Operation 1 History 2 See also 3 Notes 4

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Reusable cryogenic liquid rocket propellant tank

By: NON

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; A reusable liquid rocket propellant tank is provided. The tank consists of a composite outer shell, a foam-filled honeycomb sandwich insulat...

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Altruism

Encyclopedia Article

Giving alms to the poor is often considered an altruistic action. Altruism or selflessness is the principle or practice of concern for the welfare of others. It is a traditional virtue in many cultures and a core aspect of various religious traditions and secular worldviews, though the concept of "others" toward whom concern should be directed can vary among cultures and religions. Altruism or selflessness is the opposite of selfishness. The word was coined by the French philosopher Auguste Comte in French, as altruisme, for an antonym of egoism.[1][2] He derived it from the Italian altrui, which in turn was derived from Latin alteri, meaning "other people" or "somebody else".[3] Altruism in biological organisms can be defined as an individual performing an action which is at a cost to themselves (e.g., pleasure and quality of life, time, probability of survival or reproduction), but benefits, either directly or indirectly, another third-party individual, without the expectation of reciprocity or compensation for that action. Steinberg suggests a definition for altruism in the clinical setting, that is "intentional and voluntary actions that aim to enhance the welfare of another person in the absence of any quid pro quo external rewards". [4] Altruism can be distinguished from feelings of loyalty, in that whilst the latter is predicated upon social relationships, altruism does not consider relationships. Much debate exists as to whether "true" altruism is possible in human psychology. The theory of psychological egoism suggests that no act of sharing, helping or sacrificing can be described as truly altruistic, as the actor may receive an intrinsic reward in the form of personal gratification. The validity of this argument depends on whether intrinsic rewards qualify as "benefits". The actor also may not be expecting a reward. The term altruism may also refer to an ethi

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Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies, Volume 1

By: NON

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; Copies of nearly all of the technical papers and viewgraphs presented at the Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies hel...

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Ayn Rand

Encyclopedia Article

Ayn Rand Born Alisa Zinov'yevna Rosenbaum (1905-02-02)February 2, 1905 St. Petersburg, Russia Died March 6, 1982(1982-03-06) (aged 77) New York City, New York, U.S. Resting place Kensico Cemetery Valhalla, New York, U.S. Pen name Ayn Rand Occupation Writer Language English Ethnicity Russian Jewish Citizenship 1905–22  Russian 1922–31  Soviet 1931–82  American Alma mater Petrograd State University Period 1934–1982 Subject Philosophy Notable works The Fountainhead Atlas Shrugged Notable awards Prometheus Award Hall of Fame inductee in 1987 (for Anthem) and co-inaugural inductee in 1983 (for Atlas Shrugged) Spouse Frank O'Connor (m. 1929; wid. 1979)

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Efficient Reorientation Maneuvers for Spacecraft with Multiple Articulated Payloads

By: Mcclamroch, N. Harri

Supplemental catalog subcollection information: NASA Publication Collection; Astrophysics and Technical Documents; A final report is provided which describes the research program during the period 3 Mar. 1992 to 3 Jun. 1993. A summary of the technical res...

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Alain Connes

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Alain Connes Alain Connes in 2004 Born (1947-04-01) 1 April 1947 Draguignan, France Nationality French Fields Mathematics Institutions IHÉS, France Alma mater École Normale Supérieure, France Doctoral advisor Jacques Dixmier Doctoral students Georges Skandalis Known for Baum–Connes conjecture Noncommutative geometry Operator algebras Notable awards CNRS Silver Medal (1977) Prize Ampère (1980) Fields Medal (1982) Clay Research Award (2000) Crafoord Prize (2001) CNRS Gold medal (2004) Alain Connes (French: ; born 1 April 1947) is a French mathematician, currently Professor at the Collège de France, IHÉS, The Ohio State University and Vanderbilt University. He was an Invited Professor at the Conservatoire national des arts et métiers (2000).[1] Contents Work 1 Awards and honours 2 Books 3 See also 4

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