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National Transportation Safety Board Collection (712 Books)


The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is an independent U.S. Government investigative agency responsible for civil transportation accident investigation. In this role, the NTSB investigates and reports on aviation accidents and incidents, certain types of highway crashes, ship and marine accidents, pipeline incidents and railroad accidents. When requested, the NTSB will assist the military with accident investigation.[1] The NTSB is also in charge of investigating cases of hazardous waste releases that occur during transportation.

 
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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: About I638 eastern daylight t h e , on October 19, 1996, a McDonnell Douglas MD-88, N914DL, operated by Delta Air Lines, Inc., as flight 554, struck the approach light structure and the end of the runway deck during the approach to land on runway 13 at the LaGuardia Airport, in Flushing, New York. Flight 554 was being operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121, as a scheduled, domestic passenger flight from Atlanta, Georgia, t...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: About 1638 Eastern Daylight Time, on October 19, 1996, a McDonnell Douglas MD-88, N914DL, operated by Delta Air Lines, Inc., as flight 554, struck the approach light structure and the end of the runway deck during the approach to land on runway 13 at the LaGuardia Airport, in Flushing, New York. Flight 554 was being operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121, as a scheduled, domestic passenger flight from Atlanta, Georgia, to ...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On August 2.5, 1996, at 0710 Eastern Daylight Time, a Trans World Airlines (TWA) Lockheed L-1011, N31031, operating as flight 778, scraped the lower aft fuselage while landing at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), Jamaica, New York. The airplane was operating under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121. The landing, which occurred in deteriorating weather conditions, was the scheduled termination of a non-stop cross-coun...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On March 21, 1996, a Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. (BHTI), 205A-1 helicopter, N68HJ, crashed while conducting an external lift operation at Grove Hill, Alabama, after its vertical fin separated from the tail boom just above the intersection of the vertical fin spar and tail boom.? The aircraft was substantially damaged but the pilot was not injured. Examination of the separated pieces of the tail boom at the Safety Board?s materials laboratory revealed that the ...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: In severe frontal crashes, air bags clearly increase the chances of survival, particularly for unbelted adult drivers. The protection afforded by air bags, however, does not extend equally to all passenger vehicle occupants. Between 1993 and 1996, 38 children died because they were struck by an air bag in what would have otherwise been a survivable crash, and 23 adults were also killed by their air bags in crashes they should have survived. The increasing public...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: In severe frontal crashes, air bags clearly increase the chances of survival, particularly for unbelted adult drivers, The protection afforded by air bags, however, does not extend equally to all passenger vehicle occupants. Between 1993 and 1996, 38 children died because they were struck by an air bag in what would have otherwise been a survivable crash, and 23 adults were also killed by their air bags in crashes they should have survived. The increasing public...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On April 3, 1997, about 1948 Eastern Standard Time, a Cessna 650 (Citation III), N553AC, operated by Mercury Communications, experienced an in-flight tire while on approach to the Greater Buffalo International Airport in Buffalo, New York, While descending through 4,000 feet, the crew smelled smoke, a navigation display went blank, and radio communications were lost. After an emergency landing, ground personnel saw flames burning through a hole in the aft fusela...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: About 1554 Eastern Standard Time, on January 9, 1997, an Empresa Brasileira de Aeronautica, S/A (Embraer) EMB-120RT, N265CA, operated by COMAIR Airlines, Inc., as flight 3272, crashed during a rapid descent after an uncommanded roll excursion near Monroe, Michigan. Comair flight 3272 was being operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 as a scheduled, domestic passenger flight from the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Intern...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On October 15, 1997, about 1030 mountain daylight time, a Cessna P210N, N731NX, operated by the Sheriff?s Department of Mesa County, Colorado, experienced an in-flight electrical fire while cruising at 16,500 feet over Bryce Canyon, Utah. The commercial pilot initiated an emergency descent and landed uneventfully in Bryce Canyon with minor damage. The pilot and his passenger were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a visual flight rules ...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On February 20, 1997, at 0645 Central Standard Time, a Douglas DC-9-15, N93S, operated as Northwest Airlines (NWA) flight 219 under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121, from Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Kansas City, Missouri, experienced an in-flight electrical fire, which filled the cockpit with smoke and fumes. The crew donned their oxygen masks and turned off both generators and the battery switch. They flew with a flashlight for 1 minute and then tur...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On March 15, 1997, a Piper PA-31 airplane, operated by Cape Smythe Air Service as a scheduled commuter flight from Kivalina, Alaska, to Kotzebue, Alaska, landed with the left main landing gear (MLG) partially retracted at the Kotzebue Airport. None of the occupants was injured, and the airplane sustained minor damage. Before landing, the pilot attempted to lower the landing gear; however, the landing gear did not extend normally, and the landing gear unsafe ligh...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On June 18, 1998, a Swearingen SA226-TC Metroliner II airplane, Canadian registry C-GQAL, operated by PropAir, Inc., crashed after the left wing separated during an attempted emergency landing at Mirabel Airport, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The flight was operating as a charter from Montreal to Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. The airplane had departed from Montreal?s Dorval Airport and was climbing through 12,500 feet when the flightcrew reported a loss of hydrauli...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On April 11, 1997, the pilot of a single-seat Glaser-Dirks DG-300 glider, N70644, was killed after he lost control of the aircraft for undetermined reasons and crashed near Minden, Nevada. The National Transportation Safety Board?s investigation found that the pilot had jettisoned the glider?s canopy in an apparent attempt to parachute from the aircraft but that he was subsequently incapacitated when the canopy struck his forehead during the jettison sequence (t...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On June 2, 1998, a Boeing 757-232 (B-757), N629DL, owned and operated by Delta Airlines, Inc., was damaged when its left off-wing emergency evacuation slide separated from the airplane during a scheduled flight operated under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 en route from LaGuardia Airport (LGA) to Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport (CVG). The pilot reported that during climb out from LGA he noticed the engine indication and crew ale...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On December 6, 1995, Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) flight 722, a Boeing 747-240 ?Combi? airplane, experienced an uncontained failure2 in the low pressure turbine (LPT) area of the No. 2 engine, a General Electric Aircraft Engines (GE) CF6-50E2, shortly after takeoff from John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK), New York. The flightcrew reported that as the airplane was climbing through 1,000 feet, they heard a loud thud and grinding noise and that th...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On April 18, 1997, at 1824 Pacific daylight time, America West flight 66 (AWE66), a Boeing 737, and Ameriflight 1898 (AMF1898), a Beech 99, were involved in a near-midair collision approximately 25 miles south of McCarran International Airport, Las Vegas, Nevada. A flight attendant in the cabin fell and was seriously injured as AWE66 maneuvered to avoid the Ameriflight aircraft. Both flights were operating in visual meteorological conditions at the time of the a...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On November 24, 1996, the flightcrew of Northwest Airlines (NWA) flight 211, an Air-bus A-320-21 1, N3 IONW, experienced stiff rudder pedals approximately 50 feet above the ground before landing at Detroit Metropolitan Airport, Michigan. The flight, which was operating under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 as a regularly scheduled passenger flight from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, to Detroit, landed without further incident. The 6 cre...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On January 26, 1997, Northwest Airlines (NWA) flight 20, a Boeing 747-25 1, N627US, experienced an engine case rupture of its No. 1 Pratt & Whitney (P&W) JT9D-7Q engine during takeoff at Narita International Airport, Tokyo, Japan. During the takeoff roll, as engine power was set to approximately 1.58 engine pressure ratio and the airplane was rolling forward at low speed, a loud bang was heard by the flightcrew. The captain rejected the takeoff and returned to t...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On September 7, 1997. Canadian Airlines International flight CP30, a Boeing 767-300ER airplane, equipped General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2B6F engines, experienced an uncontained failure? of the high-pressure compressor (HPC) stage 3-9 spool (figure 1) in the No. 1 (left) engine during takeoff at Beijing. China. The airplane was on a regularly scheduled passenger flight from Beijing to Vancouver, Canada. The flightcrew reported that during the ini...

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National Transportation Safety Board Washington, D.C. 20594 Safety...

By: Jim Hall

Government Reference Publication

Excerpt: On May 12, 1997, at 1529 Eastern Daylight Time, an Xirbus Industrie cUOOB4605R 590070, operated by American Airlines as flight 903, experienced an in-flight upset at an altitude of 16,000 feet near West Palm Beach, Florida. During the upset, the stall warning system activated, the airplane rolled to extreme bank angles left and right, and rapidly descended more than 3,000 feet. One passenger sustained serious injuries, and the airplane received minor damage. Fli...

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